Twenty Mistakes that CPAs Make

Some workplace mistakes cost us dearly

Twenty Mistakes that CPAs Make

Here are twenty mistakes that CPAs make:

  1. We hire people without sufficient knowledge and temperament
  2. We accept more work than we can possibly perform
  3. We don’t cull our bad clients (which contributes to #2.)
  4. We work without taking breaks
  5. We don’t exercise
  6. We try to be experts in too many industries
  7. We use outdated computers and software (e.g., we are not paperless)
  8. We don’t plan our continuing education (and take anything we can find at the end of the year)
  9. We have no strategy, moving from one engagement to another because it’s pressing
  10. We work sitting down all day (when standup desks are available)
  11. We bill our clients months after the service is provided (rather than a couple of weeks)
  12. We allow email to drive our day (we are reactive)
  13. We don’t express sincere appreciation to our peers and employees (those fully deserving of “thank you!”)
  14. We don’t use engagement letters to define our work
  15. We have no exit strategy, hoping someone will knock on our door and offer to buy the practice
  16. We ignore those we love (because we are overworked and irritable)
  17. We don’t stay current on evolving standards
  18. We don’t fire unproductive or difficult employees
  19. We don’t deal with problems (bad clients or employees) because doing so is awkward
  20. We never pause to evaluate our lives
Twenty Mistakes that CPAs Make

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Since  1984, I have worked in public accounting, a profession I dearly love. One thing I’ve noticed about CPAs is we are too immersed in our work–to a point of blindness. We don’t step back and evaluate what or how we do things. Would we be better off if we intentionally removed certain responsibilities? Might we not be even more profitable and happier? 

Two things–more than anything else–will sap your energy and productivity: (1) difficult clients and (2) unproductive or difficult employees.

The 80/20 rule is applicable in our profession. We make 80% of our money from 20% of our work. And 80% of our headaches come from 20% of our clients and employees. (Were you awake last night thinking about one of these?) While the exact percentages may not be true for you, the concept is highly relevant. 

I’ve given you twenty mistakes that CPAs make. Are there others you would add?

If you found this article of interest, see my post What Keeps CPAs Awake at Night.

Solo Accountant or a Partnership: Which is Best?

Some people enjoy working by themselves, others in a partnership

We all live with fear, but accountants have their own variety. I think back on my college years and the wondering about how my life and career would unfold. And I wanted—really wanted—to see the future, but could not. 

At twenty-one, I would have given a prince’s sum for a crystal ball. But even if the seer’s tool existed, I had no money. So I ventured out, hands extended in darkness, hoping things would go well. And why did I desire to know the future? To avoid mistakes. To lessen my fear. But mistakes—not crystal balls—are how you learn.

Through the years, my career evolved blandly, though with a few jerks and screams (I had a brain tumor; shortly after that, my son has born with cystic fibrosis). But, overall, my work life has unfolded—like most—day by day.

My First Job

In the early days of my first job, I realized how little I knew, though I had a masters degree in accounting. Like a new golfer, I felt—and looked—awkward. My college professors trained me well, but I was still a duffer. I muddled my way through the first year, little realizing how much I was learning—and not understanding my firm was doing me a favor. They were paying me to learn. (You only get this perspective—later—when you are an employer.)

Solo accountant

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One year into public accounting, the lights came on. I finally hit shots like a real accountant. I finally felt normal. I finally moved more naturally. But after three years in my junior role, another firm came calling, asking me to move. They offered more money and more opportunity, so I ventured out.

My Second Job

My second job was more of an apprenticeship. My boss mentored and trained me. He allowed me to assume responsibility. I think you could say this is where I came into my own. But even though I liked my boss, we had disagreements. He promised one thing but delivered another. I found myself doing most of the work with no movement to the promised position. My boss was a good man, but at age 68, it was obvious, he had no desire to retire (though that was the agreement).

So, I left with no job. (I know. Not smart, huh?) This was quite scary, especially when you have two children and a wife at home—in other words, no other income. What did I do? I hung my shingle. 

Solo Accountant

In those years, I had my greatest joys and fears. To go from nothing to something was like climbing a mountain. And I am not the adventuresome type. In the early days, there was no cash flow—and I mean none. I recall, like a scene from a Charles Dickens’ story, nights of soup and bread. And much of the time, I had this deep sense of fear. Nevertheless, I survived and—at times—even thrived.  

The joy of owning my own firm came in the freedom to come and go as I pleased, to do what I wanted—and when I wanted. But freedom comes with baggage. Namely, overhead, unsteady cash flows, and legal exposure. Even so, the freedom to make my own decisions was a breath of fresh air. If I wanted to pursue a new strategy, I did so. If I wanted to leave work early, I left. If I wanted to buy a new computer, I bought it. No committees. No boss. No one was telling me what I could or could not do. It was nice.

But in working alone, I learned a few things about myself. I love freedom, but I hate fear. I also found that I am more productive in a group environment. Why? Accountability. Additionally, I discovered I need more wisdom than I (alone) possess. As much as I hate to admit it (call it pride), I need a group of people. 

Partnership

So, for most of my career, partnerships have been my work environment of choice. I like steady paychecks. I enjoy having answers to my questions just down the hallway.

The wisdom of partnerships is a beautiful thing. The Bible provides this word: 

Plans fail for lack of counsel, but with any advisors, they succeed. Proverbs 15:22

I can’t count the times I have seen problems surface—seemingly—with no answer, but then, in a partnership meeting, ideas, disagreements, thoughts are tossed around. And in the end, there is an answer. Creative, wise, sound.

Multiple perspectives meld together to provide insight, a wisdom much greater than my own. But submission is necessary to be a part of a partnership. And I think that’s hard for most people, including me. And while I desire to do as I please, the power of the group is real. People working together often achieve what individuals cannot.   

Solo or Partnership – Which Do You Prefer?

In the end, the decision to work alone or in a group is a personal decision based on our own bents. Some people work better by themselves and want freedom more than anything. I get that. Others find success in a partnership. So which are you? One who likes to work alone or one who loves a group? What makes you the way you are?